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Small hazards are a big problem National Poison Prevention Week is March 17-23

This frame grab provided Sept. 13, 2011, by Energizer/Safe Kids USA shows a youngster holding a bag of small button batteries. / AP

This frame grab provided Sept. 13, 2011, by Energizer/Safe Kids USA shows a youngster holding a bag of small button batteries. / AP

Two common household products pose a double-threat, as they’re both toxic and a choking hazard. These include round, button-sized batteries used in watches, toys and electronics and single-use laundry or dishwasher detergent capsules that look like candy.

All batteries contain toxic materials, but the small ones are more likely to end up in a curious child’s mouth. Keep them stored in a safe place. Make sure the battery access doors on toys and other items are closed securely.

Since single-use detergent packets hit the market, many children have swallowed them or otherwise been exposed to the highly concentrated detergent. Some have become quite ill and required hospitalization.

It’s easy to see why children are attracted to them. They’re colorful and squishy and could easily be mistaken for candy or a toy.

Store these capsules out of reach and out of sight of young children who may resort to climbing to get to them. Child-proof safety locks on cabinets provide added protection.