akronchildrens.org

Bone cancer doesn’t slow down this survivor

Brandon and his fiance, Kelly

While at a dirt bike race in June of 2012, Brandon O’Donnell noticed some pain in his left knee. At first he thought he had torn his meniscus, so the next day he went to his orthopedic surgeon to get an MRI. The MRI revealed the cause of his pain was osteosarcoma, a common form […]

Harper celebrates her first birthday

Harper

A whole year has gone by. When I think back to this day a year ago, I didn’t know anything about Harper’s awesomeness before she was born. I remember so many emotions that day: nervousness, excitedness, sadness. I was all over the place. If there was anything I could change, I would make sure I had seen my baby before they told me she had Down syndrome and a heart defect.

Meet Andrew: Making the transition from pediatric to adult congenital heart care

Andrew Testa

When Andrew Testa was born in June 1995, his parents, Joe and Lisa, of Green, thought they had a healthy baby boy on their hands. Little did they know their world was about to change. A routine checkup at 4 months old revealed Andrew had a heart murmur, which earned him a referral to Akron Children’s cardiology department.

Surgeons reshape baby’s skull to correct rare form of craniosynostosis

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Renae Kovacs may have been born without a soft spot, but her surgeons sure have a soft spot for her. Renae has a rare condition, called trigoncephaly metopic craniosynostosis, that causes the plates of a baby’s skull to fuse together too early to give the brain room to grow properly. Typical babies have a soft spot that allows room for growth.

Getting through surgeries with the help of a “friend”

madison-and-ron-tharp

When Madison Riley counts to 5 before going into surgery, the last person she sees is the same person she sees when it’s all done – Ron Tharp, a certified registered nurse anesthetist at Akron Children’s Hospital. Some may think this is coincidence, but for the Riley family, having Uncle Ron – as Madison calls him – by her side is a calculated matter of trust.

Emily Parkinson is Scoliosis Strong

Emily Patterson

Emily Parkinson turned her deep thoughts, wisdom and experiences since being diagnosed with scoliosis 3 years ago into a piece of art that’s an inspiration to others. The poster, entitled Scoliosis Strong, is a series of encouraging words wrapped around a picture of an S-shaped spine, representing the curve of her own backbone.