akronchildrens.org

Sliding headfirst into first base increases risk of hand, wrist and thumb injuries MLB players setting bad examples for today's youth

first-base

Major league baseball players who slide headfirst into first base are setting a bad example for today’s youth. Not only is sliding headfirst slower that just running through the base, it also puts kids at a higher risk of injuries to their hands, wrists and thumbs.

Helmets don’t reduce the risk of concussion, but have other benefits

Flick/slapstix55

Parents often ask me if there’s one type or brand of helmet on the market that I would recommend to help reduce their child’s risk of concussion. You may be surprised to learn that research shows helmet use doesn’t reduce the risk of concussion at all.

Are the latest virtual reality return-to-play performance measures the wave of the future?

Kobe Bryant's return to the game too soon may have lead to the injury in his other knee.

Typically, return-to-play decisions are clinical guesswork. But as we enter the year 2014, there are some new virtual reality-type performance tools that can more precisely indicate an athlete’s injury deficiency, as compared to his baseline measurement.

Bengals punter Huber suffered the mildest type of neck injury: Clay shoveler’s fracture

espnapi_dm_131218_nfl_golic_reaction_blandino_on_punter_hit_wmain

When people hear neck injury, they think it’s serious, for good reason. But this Kevin Huber of the Cincinnati Bengals suffered the mildest type, and in about 4 to 6 weeks, it will have healed on its own.

Has all this talk of concussions and brain injuries negatively affected youth football participation?

Photo: Flickr/CC by StuSeeger

With all the recent discussions on concussions and brain injuries, you’ve got to wonder if it’s negatively affecting youth football participation. Well, the data is in. In the last two years, we’ve seen overall an 11 percent decline in youth football participation across the country.

Physical therapists play an integral role on the sports medicine team

Andrew Bynum from 2012 when he played for the Lakers. < a  href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/27003603@N00/6963599209/in/photolist-bBmgrk-bBkWpa-boqX59-boqUfN-921M4k-bFjW8e-bsq3Bh-bFjVz2-bFjX8e-bFjVNr-bsq3PW-bsq3vq-bFjW3c-bsq43Q-bsq4mq-bFjWre-bsq4Jh-bsq3c9-bsq57S-bFjX3r-bsq6dJ-bFjV1D-bFjXNn-bsq66Q-bFjWGD-bFjV9x-bsq4VQ-bsq61d-bsq539-bsq3rd-bFjWwX-bFjWkg-bsq5L7-bsq3kW-bsq5mJ-bsq5EJ-bsq5Af">Photo: Keith Allison / CC Flickr

There’s a battle of the “reclamation projects” — what I like to call it — going on in the NBA right now. Cleveland Cavs’ Andrew Bynum is rehabbing six hours a day to get ready for the season due to knee injuries, while Miami Heat’s Greg Oden is working with a physical therapist five hours a day after several microfracture surgeries.